January 08, 2013

Gun Violence and Young Adult Cancer?

 

I was diagnosed with cancer at age 27 and have gone on to become a major advocate in the young adult cancer community.  It is truly incredible to see how many people rally around the cause of cancer when they or a loved one is touched by this killer disease. Gun violence is a disease too.  And one that can be controlled a lot more easily than cancer.  With gun violence we don’t need to spend over three decades unlocking the secrets of science.  We simply need strict gun policies, enforcement, and regulation.  Gun shootings and gun deaths are preventable.  I didn’t beat cancer only to get gunned down in a shopping mall, temple, or movie theater.

Here are some facts from the Violence Policy Center that recently startled me:

“Firearms are the second most frequent cause of death overall for Americans ages 15 to 24.”

“Direct medical costs for gunshot wounds total more than six million dollars a day. Nonfatal gunshot wounds are the leading source of uninsured hospital stays in the United States, with an estimated half of such costs borne directly by the public.”

I fight so hard each day to help improve the quality of life for young adults and to reduce the out of control costs and tame the haywire finances of our healthcare system.  Young adult cancer touched my life, so it is an obvious way to focus my efforts.  If I could have prevented getting thyroid cancer I certainly would have.   If I can prevent myself and my loved ones from becoming victims of gun violence, why wouldn’t I?

I am learning about the smartest, most effective ways for me to engage in the movement to end gun violence. I have signed up for action alerts from the following reputable organizations and I contacted the White House and my members of Congress to express my opinions.  I hope you will do the same.

Demand A Plan – Easy steps for contacting Obama and your Senator

Violence Policy Center Action Network

Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence

Coalition to Stop Gun Violence

Please share this post and resources with other friends and loved ones in the cancer community!

 

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